Food is more than just sustenance; it is our culture, our identity, and representative of our way of life. In the United States, the influence of many cultures flavors our palates. Although some people think of this country as a melting pot, it's more of a salad bowl with different groups of people and ideas thrown together in one place, without necessarily losing their original identities.

If the United States is what it eats, what would you say it is? What does it say about the things we value? And what are the things you think should change? Share with us at market on social media! #ffmshares

Here are a few writers who inspired us with their ideas:

What Americans Can Learn from Other Food Cultures

A Never-Give-It-Up Fall Cooking Tradition That Saves Neither Time Nor Money

What These 5 Mealtime Traditions From Around the World Can Teach Us About Bonding
 
 
Potatoes, Bacon, Veggies oh my!
By Jewell Fears

I woke up this past Sunday morning wanting something homey, salty and ready in under 20 minutes. Pancakes were an option, but didn’t’ want to deal with a batter. Bacon, ok maybe. Eggs… meh. But then I looked in my dry pantry and these pretty little multi-colored baby potatoes were staring happily back at me. Starchy, filling and after a quick flashback to one of my mother's’ go to breakfast favorites, remembered how great they are when combined with onions.

Perfect I thought. Now what exactly am I gonna do with these little darlings? They are great for roasting, mashing, smothering, getting nice and crusty in a skillet or even over an open flame. Being that I hadn’t yet had my coffee and was still in my bunny slippers, I decided an open flame was probably not my best bet. I was also thinking about how warm my bed was and my 20 minute time limit. Ah hah! How about a multi-colored breakfast hash? Yes! Add in some bacon? Duh! And any other tidbits in my fridge that might make it more fun. My breakfast hash was born! And just for good measure… add in some maple syrup to make it extra breakfasty. Enjoy!

Sunday Morning Hash

Prep: 10 Minutes
Cook Time: 10 Minutes
Total Time: 20 Minutes
Serves: 2 Generously

Ingredients
  • (2) Slices Applewood Smoked Bacon
  • (7-10) Multi-Colored Baby Potatoes
  • (1) Medium Onion
  • (2) Large Cloves Garlic
  • (3-5) Mini Sweet Peppers
  • 1/3c Maple Syrup or Honey
  • Bacon fat, ghee or neutral oil
  • Salt, to taste
  • (2) Sunnyside Up Eggs
*See notes below for alternatives

Instructions
  • Small dice all ingredients above before preheating sautée pan. You will be adding each item in succession so dicing now makes it much easier not to overcook or burn anything.
  • Add your sauté pan over medium heat and allow it to get nice and hot. Add your bacon first allowing it to render fat and begin to brown.
  • Once slightly browned and almost beginning to darken, remove bacon from pan leaving the fat and place on heat proof plate.
  • Add potatoes to the bacon fat tossing to coat. Sprinkle gently with salt allowing it to penetrate before stirring.
  • Begin to stir gently scraping the bottom of the pan to ensure the potatoes don’t burn adding additional fat if needed.
  • Cook the potatoes to a soft consistency, but not mushy with a little color and texture on the outside
  • Once soft, add onion and garlic stirring into potatoes and remaining fat
  • Once onions have softened and garlic has become fragrant, about 2-3 minutes, add peppers and  toss to combine
  • When peppers have begun to soften, another 2-3 minutes, add bacon back to warm and flavors to combine.
  • At this point the hash is complete, but I generally like to add maple syrup to make it a bit sweet and salty. Adding the syrup and allowing it to coat the hash for 1-2 minutes on the heat is pure perfection.
  • Fry Sunnyside-up eggs separately and plop right on top!
  • Serve while hot!

Alternatives
  • Using Turkey bacon is always an option for a healthier hash, as well as Tofurky bacon for a no meat substitute.
  • If using a meat substitute, you will need to use more fat as there will not be enough in the meat itself to coat all the ingredients. For a healthier option, using Ghee or a Neutral Oil such as Avocado or Sunflower oil will do the trick nicely. Just be careful not to deep fry your hash.
  • Instead of going the sweet route using maple syrup, feel free to use honey instead. You’ll still achieve the nice coating with a less sweet flavor.
  • Feel free to add in any other fun items you may have in your fridge from the farmers market. Celery, quinoa, fresh corn, broccoli or even a jalapeño!